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Live in Rotterdam 1967

Thelonious Monk

Live in Rotterdam 1967

Price: € 22.95 16.07
Format: CD
Label: Fondamenta
UPC: 0889854691721
Catnr: FON 170402
Release date: 08 December 2017
old €22.95 new € 16.07
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2 CD
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22.95 16.07
old €22.95 new € 16.07
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Label
Fondamenta
UPC
0889854691721
Catalogue number
FON 170402
Release date
08 December 2017

"The double CD provides insight into a historic moment in which Monk visited our country. A beautiful and very dynamic recording."

Music Emotion, 30-3-2018
Album
Artist(s)
Composer(s)
Press
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DE

About the album

When he set foot on the stage of Club Doelen on Oct. 28, 1967 in Rotterdam, Thelonious Monk had just turned 50. 15 years later, he disappeared from the music scene and spent his 6 final years in New York, at Pannonica de Koenigswater's, and never touched a piano again.

This concert is a testament to his genius. Opening and ending with two “classic pieces”, “Ruby, My Dear” and “Blue Monk”, he led for over 80 minutes the quartet and his accomplices, Charlie Rouse, Larry Gales, Ben Riley, and guests.

Larry Gales's bass seems to pop out like a jack-in-the-box at the end of “Hackensack”, the brass instruments get carried away towards the middle of “We see”, and billow out and away in the breathtaking “Oska”. And it all leads to a solo time on “Don't Blame Me”: his fingers must be widely spread apart as he hits the keys the way you'd hit and shuffle cards. And then it's time to conclude with one of his classic tunes “Blue Monk”. The architect can set down his tools, what remains is pure art.

Als er am 28. Oktober 1967 in Rotterdam die Bühne des Club Doelen betrat, war Thelonious Monk gerade 50 Jahre alt geworden. 15 Jahre später verschwand er aus der Musikszene und verbrachte seine letzten 6 Jahre in der Villa von Baroness de Koenigswarter in New York und berührte nie wieder ein Klavier.
Dieses Konzert zeugt von seinem Genie. Er eröffnete und endete mit zwei "Klassikern","Ruby, My Dear" und "Blue Monk" und führte über 80 Minuten lang das Quartett und seine Mitstreiter Charlie Rouse, Larry Gales, Ben Riley und Gäste an.
Larry Gales' Bass scheint am Ende von "Hackensack" wie ein Jack-in-the-Box zu springen, die Blechblasinstrumente werden in die Mitte von "We see" getragen und blähen sich in der atemberaubenden "Oska" auf und ab. Und das führt zu einer Solo-Session bei "Don' t Blame Me": seine Finger müssen weit auseinander liegen, wenn er die Tasten so drückt, wie man Karten schlägt und mischt. Und dann ist es Zeit, mit einem seiner Klassiker "Blue Monk" abzuschließen. Der Architekt kann seine Werkzeuge niederlegen, was bleibt, ist reine Kunst.

Artist(s)

Thelonious Monk (piano)

The most important jazz musicians are the ones who are successful in creating their own original world of music with its own rules, logic, and surprises. Thelonious Monk, who was criticized by observers who failed to listen to his music on its own terms, suffered through a decade of neglect before he was suddenly acclaimed as a genius; his music had not changed one bit in the interim. In fact, one of the more remarkable aspects of Monk's music was that it was fully formed by 1947 and he saw no need to alter his playing or compositional style in the slightest during the next 25 years.
more
The most important jazz musicians are the ones who are successful in creating their own original world of music with its own rules, logic, and surprises. Thelonious Monk, who was criticized by observers who failed to listen to his music on its own terms, suffered through a decade of neglect before he was suddenly acclaimed as a genius; his music had not changed one bit in the interim. In fact, one of the more remarkable aspects of Monk's music was that it was fully formed by 1947 and he saw no need to alter his playing or compositional style in the slightest during the next 25 years.

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Clark Terry (trumpet)

Clark Terry's career in jazz spans more than sixty years. He is a world-class trumpeter, flugelhornist, educator, and NEA Jazz Master. He performed for seven U.S. Presidents, and was a Jazz Ambassador for State Department tours in the Middle East and Africa. More than fifty jazz festivals in all seven continents still feature him. He received two Grammy certificates, three Grammy nominations, thirteen honorary doctorates, keys to cities, lifetime achievements and halls of fame awards. He was knighted in Germany and is the recipient of the French Order of Arts and Letters. Clark's star on the Walk of Fame, and his Black World History Museum's life-sized wax figure can both be visited in his hometown, St. Louis, Missouri. Clark composed more...
more
Clark Terry's career in jazz spans more than sixty years. He is a world-class trumpeter, flugelhornist, educator, and NEA Jazz Master. He performed for seven U.S. Presidents, and was a Jazz Ambassador for State Department tours in the Middle East and Africa. More than fifty jazz festivals in all seven continents still feature him. He received two Grammy certificates, three Grammy nominations, thirteen honorary doctorates, keys to cities, lifetime achievements and halls of fame awards. He was knighted in Germany and is the recipient of the French Order of Arts and Letters. Clark's star on the Walk of Fame, and his Black World History Museum's life-sized wax figure can both be visited in his hometown, St. Louis, Missouri.
Clark composed more than two hundred jazz songs, and his books include Let's Talk Trumpet: From Legit to Jazz, Interpretation of the Jazz Language and Clark Terry's System of Circular Breathing for Woodwind and Brass Instruments.
He recorded with The London Symphony Orchestra, The Dutch Metropole Orchestra, The Duke Ellington Orchestra and The Chicago Jazz Orchestra, at least thirty high school and college ensembles, his own duos, trios, quartets, quintets, sextets, octets, and two big bands -- Clark Terry's Big Bad Band and Clark Terry's Young Titans of Jazz. His career as both leader and sideman with more than three hundred recordings demonstrates that he is one of the luminaries in jazz.
Clark's discography reads like a "Who's Who In Jazz," with personnel that includes great jazz artists such as Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Quincy Jones, Ella Fitzgerald, Oscar Peterson, Dizzy Gillespie, Dinah Washington, Ben Webster, Charlie Barnet, Doc Severinsen, Ray Charles, Billy Strayhorn, Dexter Gordon, Thelonious Monk, Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughn, Coleman Hawkins, Zoot Sims, Milt Jackson, Bob Brookmeyer, Jon Faddis, and Dianne Reeves.
"Clark Terry," writes Chuck Berg, "is one of contemporary music's great innovators, and justly celebrated for his great technical virtuosity, swinging lyricism, and impeccable good taste. Combining these with the gifts of a great dramatist, Clark is a master storyteller whose spellbinding musical 'tales' leave audiences thrilled and always awaiting more." In the 1940s, after serving in the Navy, Clark's musical star rose rapidly with successful stints in the bands of George Hudson, Charlie Barnet, Charlie Ventura, Eddie Vinson, and then in 1948 -- the great Count Basie. In addition to his outstanding musical contribution to these bands, Mr. Terry exerted a positive influence on musicians such as Miles Davis and Quincy Jones, both of whom credit Clark as a formidable influence during the early stages of their careers. In 1951 Clark was asked to join Maestro Duke Ellington's renowned orchestra where he stayed for eight years as a featured soloist.
Following a tour with Harold Arlen's "Free and Easy" show directed by Quincy Jones in 1960, Clark's international recognition soared when he accepted an offer from the National Broadcasting Company to become its first African American staff musician. Soon after, Clark became a ten year television star as one of the spotlighted players in the Tonight Show band where he scored a smash hit as a singer with his irrepressible "Mumbles." From the 70's through the 90's, Clark performed at Carnegie Hall, Town Hall, and Lincoln Center, toured with the Newport Jazz All Stars and Jazz at the Philharmonic, and he was featured with Skitch Henderson's New York Pops Orchestra. Since 2000, he hosts Clark Terry Jazz Festivals on land and sea, and his own jazz camps.
Prompted early in his career by Dr. Billy Taylor, Clark and Milt Hinton bought instruments for and gave instruction to young hopefuls which planted the seed that became Jazz Mobile in Harlem. This venture tugged at Clark's greatest love - involving youth in the perpetuation of Jazz. Between global performances, Clark continues to share wholeheartedly his jazz expertise and encourage students.

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Johnny Griffin (tenor saxophone)

Phil Woods (alto saxophone)

Jimmy Cleveland (trombone)

Charlie Rouse (tenor saxophone)

Ray Copeland (trumpet)

Larry Gales (double bass)

Ben Riley (drums)

Composer(s)

Thelonious Monk

The most important jazz musicians are the ones who are successful in creating their own original world of music with its own rules, logic, and surprises. Thelonious Monk, who was criticized by observers who failed to listen to his music on its own terms, suffered through a decade of neglect before he was suddenly acclaimed as a genius; his music had not changed one bit in the interim. In fact, one of the more remarkable aspects of Monk's music was that it was fully formed by 1947 and he saw no need to alter his playing or compositional style in the slightest during the next 25 years.
more
The most important jazz musicians are the ones who are successful in creating their own original world of music with its own rules, logic, and surprises. Thelonious Monk, who was criticized by observers who failed to listen to his music on its own terms, suffered through a decade of neglect before he was suddenly acclaimed as a genius; his music had not changed one bit in the interim. In fact, one of the more remarkable aspects of Monk's music was that it was fully formed by 1947 and he saw no need to alter his playing or compositional style in the slightest during the next 25 years.

less

Press

The double CD provides insight into a historic moment in which Monk visited our country. A beautiful and very dynamic recording.
Music Emotion, 30-3-2018

Virtuoso, technically stunning, these are not concepts which labeled Thelonious Monk. But there is probably no other pianist who can speak so much with one note.
De Nieuwe Muze, 21-2-2018

Proud of this document from Rotterdam.
Jazzism, 16-2-2018

The concert sounds like it happened yesterday and completely shades all previous unofficial, inferior (and incomplete) editions. Bravo!
Mania, 02-2-2018

Thelonious Monk was a musical innovator, always looking for new ways of playing where he sometimes ‘just’ stopped playing during solo’s and thus gave the soloist plenty of room, using new harmonies and tempo doubling (‘Epistrophy’). With this double CD it’s so great to enjoy The High Priest of Bebop over and over again.
Music Frames, 08-1-2018

The albums have been exceptionally well-edited, with pleasantly felt cardboard covers and luxuriously executed booklets. The fitting name for this special series is 'The Lost Recordings'.
Jazzenzo, 02-12-2017

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Often bought together with..

Live at The Concertgebouw 1961
Oscar Peterson Trio
Live At The Kurhaus 1967
Dave Brubeck Quartet
On The Spot
Calefax ft Eric Vloeimans
Ellington Suites
Overwater, Tony Trio & Calefax Reed Quintet

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