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More Sounds of a Dry Martini

Brent Jensen

More Sounds of a Dry Martini

Price: € 19.95
Format: CD
Label: Origin Records
UPC: 0805558282126
Catnr: ORIGIN 82821
Release date: 06 August 2021
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Label
Origin Records
UPC
0805558282126
Catalogue number
ORIGIN 82821
Release date
06 August 2021
Album
Artist(s)
Composer(s)
EN
DE

About the album

In 2001, alto saxophonist Brent Jensen released The Sound of a Dry Martini: Remembering Paul Desmond. Resonating immediately with radio stations and their audiences, the album has been a consistent presence on the airwaves and has been streamed thousands of times a week since that technology was first conceived. Some twenty years later, Jensen now offers the house another round. Joined by guitarist Jamie Findlay, his long time partner in interpreting Desmond's works, Jensen improvises new melodies as rich and satisfying as the tunes from which they are based, subtly coloring his lines with romance, melancholy and joy. He shares a stylistic affinity with both Desmond and Lee Konitz in a lyrical sense, weaving singing, free-flowing lines in his own singular voice through Desmond favorites such as “Take Ten,” and “Desmond Blue,” or standards like "These Foolish Things" and "Alone Together." Supported by an outstanding Seattle cast - drummers Stefan Schatz and John Bishop, bassist Chris Symer and pianist Bill Anschell - Jensen creates another irresistible tribute to an iconic musical voice.
Im Jahr 2001 veröffentlichte der Altsaxophonist Brent Jensen das Buch The Sound of a Dry Martini: Remembering Paul Desmond. Das Album fand sofort Anklang bei den Radiosendern und ihren Zuhörern und ist seit der Einführung dieser Technologie ständig im Äther präsent und wird wöchentlich tausende Male gestreamt. Etwa zwanzig Jahre später bietet Jensen nun eine weitere Runde an. Zusammen mit dem Gitarristen Jamie Findlay, seinem langjährigen Partner bei der Interpretation von Desmonds Werken, improvisiert Jensen neue Melodien, die so reichhaltig und überzeugend sind wie die Melodien, auf denen sie basieren, und färbt seine Linien subtil mit Romantik, Melancholie und Freude. Er teilt eine stilistische Verwandtschaft mit Desmond und Lee Konitz in lyrischer Hinsicht und webt singende, frei fließende Linien mit seiner eigenen einzigartigen Stimme durch Desmond-Favoriten wie "Take Ten" und "Desmond Blue" oder Standards wie "These Foolish Things" und "Alone Together". Unterstützt von einer hervorragenden Besetzung aus Seattle - den Schlagzeugern Stefan Schatz und John Bishop, dem Bassisten Chris Symer und dem Pianisten Bill Anschell - schafft Jensen eine weitere unwiderstehliche Hommage an eine ikonische musikalische Stimme.

Artist(s)

Brent Jensen (alto saxophone)

Now making his home in Seattle, saxophonist Brent Jensen was the Director of Jazz Studies at the College of Southern Idaho for many years. As the artistic director for the CSI Jazz Summit and the Jazz Saturdays workshop series, Jensen was a major force in cultivating new performers and bringing world-class jazz events to Idaho, creating a climate of rich cultural pursuit that remains since his departure.  Raised in Boise, Brent Jensen studied in New York City with jazz legend Lee Konitz on a grant in 1987 from the Idaho Commission on the Arts. He was a featured winner of the Woodwinds on Fire international talent search conducted in 1996 by Jazziz magazine and has performed with a variety of jazz...
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Now making his home in Seattle, saxophonist Brent Jensen was the Director of Jazz Studies at the College of Southern Idaho for many years. As the artistic director for the CSI Jazz Summit and the Jazz Saturdays workshop series, Jensen was a major force in cultivating new performers and bringing world-class jazz events to Idaho, creating a climate of rich cultural pursuit that remains since his departure. Raised in Boise, Brent Jensen studied in New York City with jazz legend Lee Konitz on a grant in 1987 from the Idaho Commission on the Arts. He was a featured winner of the Woodwinds on Fire international talent search conducted in 1996 by Jazziz magazine and has performed with a variety of jazz artists including Gene Harris, Bobby Shew, Gary Foster, John Clayton, Joe LaBarbera, Wycliffe Gordon, Warren Vache, John Stowell, Bill Watrous, Jamie Findlay, Dave Peck, Dianne Schuur, Kristin Korb, Marc Seales, Doug Miller, John Bishop, Bill Anschell, Don Sickler and many others. Brent's nine recordings received significant national radio airplay and have been featured in all the major jazz periodicals. His debut CD for the Origin label, The Sound of a Dry Martini: Remembering Paul Desmond, charted on JazzWeek's Top 50 for thirteen weeks in the spring of 2002. Selections continue to be in rotation on a number of jazz radio stations across the country 17 years later. Dry Martini was also featured on Jazzweek's Top 100 and NPR's JazzWorks' Top 25 lists for the year 2002. Brent's second recording for Origin, Stay Cool, made Jim Wilke's (host of Jazz After Hours) "Favorite Jazz CD 2002" list. His duo recording with pianist Bill Anschell, We Couldn't Agree More was named a "Critic's Choice" pick by Jazziz magazine and one of Jim Wilke's "Best Northwest Jazz" CDs.

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Composer(s)

Duke Ellington

Duke Ellington influenced millions of people both around the world and at home. He gave American music its own sound for the first time. In his fifty year career, he played over 20,000 performances in Europe, Latin America, the Middle East as well as Asia. Simply put, Ellington transcends boundaries and fills the world with a treasure trove of music that renews itself through every generation of fans and music-lovers. His legacy continues to live onand will endure for generations to come. Winton Marsalis said it best when he said 'His music sounds like America.' Because of the unmatched artistic heights to which he soared, no one deserved the phrase “beyond category” more than Ellington, for it aptly describes his life as well. He was...
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Duke Ellington influenced millions of people both around the world and at home. He gave American music its own sound for the first time. In his fifty year career, he played over 20,000 performances in Europe, Latin America, the Middle East as well as Asia.

Simply put, Ellington transcends boundaries and fills the world with a treasure trove of music that renews itself through every generation of fans and music-lovers. His legacy continues to live onand will endure for generations to come. Winton Marsalis said it best when he said "His music sounds like America." Because of the unmatched artistic heights to which he soared, no one deserved the phrase “beyond category” more than Ellington, for it aptly describes his life as well. He was most certainly one of a kind that maintained a llifestyle with universal appeal which transcended countless boundaries.

Duke Ellington is best remembered for the over 3000 songs that he composed during his lifetime. His best known titles include; "It Don't Mean a Thing if It Ain't Got That Swing", "Sophisticated Lady", "Mood Indigo", “Solitude", "In a Mellotone",and "Satin Doll". The most amazing part about Ellington was the most creative while he was on the road. It was during this time when he wrote his most famous piece, "Mood Indigo"which brought him world wide fame.

When asked what inspired him to write, Ellington replied, "My men and my race are the inspiration of my work. I try to catch the character and mood and feeling of my people".

Duke Ellington's popular compositions set the bar for generations of brilliant jazz, pop, theatre and soundtrack composers to come. While these compositions guarantee his greatness, whatmakes Duke an iconoclastic genius, and an unparalleled visionary, what has granted him immortality are his extended suites. From 1943's Black, Brown and Beige to 1972's The Uwis Suite, Duke used the suite format to give his jazz songs a far more empowering meaning, resonance and purpose: to exalt, mythologize and re-contextualize the African-American experience on a grand scale.

Duke Ellington was partial to giving brief verbal accounts of the moods his songs captured. Reading those accounts is like looking deep into the background of an old photo of New York and noticing the lost and almost unaccountable details that gave the city its character during Ellington's heyday, which began in 1927 when his band made the Cotton Club its home.''The memory of things gone,'' Ellington once said, ''is important to a jazz musician,'' and the stories he sometimes told about his songs are the record of those things gone. But what is gone returns, its pulse kicking, when Ellington's music plays, and never mind what past it is, for the music itself still carries us forward today.

Duke Ellington was awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1966. He was later awarded several other prizes, the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1969, and the Legion of Honor by France in 1973, the highest civilian honors in each country. He died of lung cancer and pneumonia on May 24, 1974, a month after his 75th birthday, and is buried in theBronx, in New York City. At his funeral attendedby over 12,000 people at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, Ella Fitzgerald summed up the occasion, "It's a very sad day...A genius has passed."


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