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Magical Memories

Tine Thing Helseth / Kåre Nordstoga

Magical Memories

Format: CD
Label: Lawo Classics
UPC: 7090020182384
Catnr: LWC 1216
Release date: 28 May 2021
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1 CD
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Label
Lawo Classics
UPC
7090020182384
Catalogue number
LWC 1216
Release date
28 May 2021
Album
Artist(s)
Composer(s)
EN

About the album

Norwegian trumpeter Tine Thing Helseth releases her new album Magical Memories on Friday 28 May on LAWO Classics.

The recording is deeply personal; made up of Helseth’s favourite pieces which explore the full sound, range, and moods of the instrument. It includes music she remembers hearing during her childhood such as Lindberg’s Gammal Fäbodpsalm från Dalarna and Purcell’s Trumpet Tune in C major as well as modern songs for special occasions such as Sjöberg’s Den första gång jag såg dig - a Swedish love song translated as The First Time I Saw You. Composers include Marcello, Telemann, Grieg, Moraeus, Lindberg, Sommerro and many more.

Tine Thing Helseth says: “This is a very personal album to me. Whilst I was growing up my mother also played the trumpet, and many of these pieces are works that I listened to laying on the floor next to the organ whilst she was at rehearsals. She took me from when I was 6 weeks old! Other tracks are just lovely melodies and songs that people often use on special occasions: happy or sad. So, the album is filled with my musical memories and my hope is that it will bring musical memories to the listeners as well.”

Helseth and organist Kåre Nordstoga recorded the album in Oslo Cathedral, during Norway’s lockdown in late August/early September 2020 and worked from late in the evening into the early hours of the morning to carefully capture the perfect sound, undisturbed by even the already minimized noise of the outside world.

This physical sanctuary reflects the haven Helseth creates for her audience and throughout the album, the listener is transported into a world of vivid colours and emotions. For Helseth, it is a place where she can express herself in the most personal and genuine way. She and Nordstoga improvise on three of the tracks – the Sjöberg and two wedding marches – joining them together with listeners to experience the magic of music.

In the lead up to the release, there will be three digital singles. The first one, Prelude from Charpentier's Te Deum is already out. The other two are: Sigurjónsson, arr: Jarle Storløkken’s Sofðu unga ástin mín (26 March); and Purcell’s Trumpet Tune (23 April).

http://www.tinethinghelseth.com/

Artist(s)

Kåre Nordstoga (organ)

Kåre Nordstoga is considered to be one of the foremost concert organists in Europe. He made his debut in 1978 in Oslo Cathedral, where he became Assistant Organist in 1984, and taught for a time at the Norwegian Academy of Music before becoming the cathedral’s full-time Organist in 1994. Nordstoga has released several solo recordings and has participated in a number of releases. As a highly valued accompanist and soloist, he regularly collaborates with some of Norway’s best-known musicians, and is invited to give solo performances on the largest and most renowned organs in Europe. In 2016 Nordstoga was appointed by His Majesty The King of Norway as a Knight (first class) of the Royal Norwegian Order of St Olaf...
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Kåre Nordstoga is considered to be one of the foremost concert organists in Europe. He made his debut in 1978 in Oslo Cathedral, where he became Assistant Organist in 1984, and taught for a time at the Norwegian Academy of Music before becoming the cathedral’s full-time Organist in 1994. Nordstoga has released several solo recordings and has participated in a number of releases. As a highly valued accompanist and soloist, he regularly collaborates with some of Norway’s best-known musicians, and is invited to give solo performances on the largest and most renowned organs in Europe. In 2016 Nordstoga was appointed by His Majesty The King of Norway as a Knight (first class) of the Royal Norwegian Order of St Olaf for his contribution to Norwegian church music.

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Tine Thing Helseth (trumpet)

Since the beginning of her career, Norwegian trumpeter Tine Thing Helseth has championed the trumpet repertoire amongst audiences on all six continents, meriting the highest critical praise for her soulful, lyrical sound and collaborative approach to music-making. An artist who challenges the boundaries of genre with an intensely creative, open-minded philosophy, Tine’s ever-expanding repertoire ranges from the classical period to contemporary works and new commissions.    She has been the recipient of numerous awards for her work in classical music, including “Newcomer of the Year” at the 2013 Echo Klassik Awards, the 2009 Borletti-Buitoni Trust Fellowship, and second prize in the 2006 Eurovision Young Musicians Competition, to which Tine returned to serve as juror for the 2016 competition. In 2007, Tine had...
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Since the beginning of her career, Norwegian trumpeter Tine Thing Helseth has championed the trumpet repertoire amongst audiences on all six continents, meriting the highest critical praise for her soulful, lyrical sound and collaborative approach to music-making. An artist who challenges the boundaries of genre with an intensely creative, open-minded philosophy, Tine’s ever-expanding repertoire ranges from the classical period to contemporary works and new commissions. She has been the recipient of numerous awards for her work in classical music, including “Newcomer of the Year” at the 2013 Echo Klassik Awards, the 2009 Borletti-Buitoni Trust Fellowship, and second prize in the 2006 Eurovision Young Musicians Competition, to which Tine returned to serve as juror for the 2016 competition. In 2007, Tine had the rare honour of being the first ever classical artist to win Newcomer of the Year at the Norwegian Grammy Awards (Spellemannprisen).
Tine has worked with some of the world's leading orchestras, including the NDR Elbphilharmonie Hamburg, Gürzenich-Orchester Cologne, Tonkünstler-Orchester Vienna, Philharmonia Orchestra, BBC Scottish Orchestra at the BBC Proms, Warsaw, Rotterdam, Oslo, Bergen and Helsinki Philharmonic orchestras, Danish Radio Symphony orchestra, Royal Stockholm Philharmonic and Swedish Radio Symphony, Minneapolis, Baltimore and Cincinnati Symphony orchestras, Tokyo Symphony, Singapore Symphony, KBS Symphony and Hong Kong Philharmonic. She also enjoys collaborating with a number of chamber orchestras, namely the Norwegian Chamber, Zurich Chamber and Munich Chamber orchestras, Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, Australian Chamber Orchestra, and as well as the Orchestre de chambre de Lausanne, Mozarteum Salzburg, and the Hong Kong Sinfonietta.
Tine continues to embark on regular tours with her ten-piece, all-female brass ensemble tenThing. An idea which started in 2007 as a fun and exciting project to pursue with her closest musical friends, the group have gone on to play to numerous audiences across Europe, USA and China. Past festival appearances include the BBC Proms, Schleswig-Holstein, Beethoven Bonn, Gstaad, MDR Musiksommer, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Rheingau, Merano, Thüringer Bachwochen, and Bremen. In August 2021 Tine released a highly anticipated album Magical Memories for Trumpet and Organ (LWC1216) on the LAWO Classics label which was selected by Gramophone to feature in their “Recording of the Year 2021” August selection and received 5* review from BBC Music Magazine. Earlier recordings include concertos by Haydn, Albioni, Neruda and Hummel with the Norwegian Chamber Orchestra, Storyteller with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic released on the EMI Classics label, a self-titled CD in March 2013, presenting a personal selection of original and transcribed works accompanied by pianist Kathryn Stott, and an album with tenThing Brass Ensemble released on Warner Classics.
Tine resides in Oslo and maintains an active role in her community as a regular TV and radio presenter and teaches trumpet at the Norwegian Academy of Music. An all-round musician, she also regularly performs in some of the most iconic jazz bars in Norway. In June 2013, Tine launched her own project, Tine@Munch, in celebration of the 150th anniversary of the birth of Edvard Munch, featuring a variety of performances and guest artists such as Leif Ove Andsnes, Nicola Benedetti, and Truls Mork. Since 2019, she is a member of Artistic Board at Risør Chamber Music Festival.

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Composer(s)

Edvard Grieg

Edvard Hagerup Grieg was a Norwegian composer and pianist. He is widely considered one of the leading Romantic era composers, and his music is part of the standard classical repertoire worldwide. His use and development of Norwegian folk music in his own compositions put the music of Norway in the international spectrum, as well as helping to develop a national identity, much as Jean Sibelius and Antonín Dvořák did in Finland and Bohemia, respectively. Grieg is regarded as simultaneously nationalistic and cosmopolitan in his orientation, for although born in Bergen and buried there, he travelled widely throughout Europe, and considered his music to express both the beauty of Norwegian rural life and the culture of Europe as a whole. He is...
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Edvard Hagerup Grieg was a Norwegian composer and pianist. He is widely considered one of the leading Romantic era composers, and his music is part of the standard classical repertoire worldwide. His use and development of Norwegian folk music in his own compositions put the music of Norway in the international spectrum, as well as helping to develop a national identity, much as Jean Sibelius and Antonín Dvořák did in Finland and Bohemia, respectively.
Grieg is regarded as simultaneously nationalistic and cosmopolitan in his orientation, for although born in Bergen and buried there, he travelled widely throughout Europe, and considered his music to express both the beauty of Norwegian rural life and the culture of Europe as a whole. He is the most celebrated person from the city of Bergen, with numerous statues depicting his image, and many cultural entities named after him.
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Henry Purcell

Westminster Abbey is not just the place where British monarchs were crowned, it's also the place where many English great men were burried. Among those was also Henry Purcell. This final resting place had a double meaning for him: firstly, with his status as a composer he deserved a spot in the abbey, but secondly this was also the location where he worked during the reign of Charles II and William & Mary.  Most people will recognise the last aria of Purcell's beloved opera Dido and Aeneas: 'Remember me, but ah! forget my fate.' More abstract, but less trenchant are his brilliant Fantasias (for viola da gamba) which Purcell composed in the early 1680s. These are small, at times daringly expirimental works, which...
more

Westminster Abbey is not just the place where British monarchs were crowned, it's also the place where many English great men were burried. Among those was also Henry Purcell. This final resting place had a double meaning for him: firstly, with his status as a composer he deserved a spot in the abbey, but secondly this was also the location where he worked during the reign of Charles II and William & Mary. Most people will recognise the last aria of Purcell's beloved opera Dido and Aeneas: "Remember me, but ah! forget my fate." More abstract, but less trenchant are his brilliant Fantasias (for viola da gamba) which Purcell composed in the early 1680s. These are small, at times daringly expirimental works, which he carefully dated. Yet, Purcell mostly developed himself as a composer of vocal music, with numerous odes, 'welcome songs', motets (anthems), songs for domestic use (both sacred and secular, both monophonic and polyphonic) and music for theatre.


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Georg Philipp Telemann

Georg Philipp Telemann (14 March 1681 – 25 June 1767) was a German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist. Almost completely self-taught in music, he became a composer against his family's wishes. After studying in Magdeburg, Zellerfeld, and Hildesheim, Telemann entered the University of Leipzig to study law, but eventually settled on a career in music. He held important positions in Leipzig, Sorau, Eisenach, and Frankfurt before settling in Hamburg in 1721, where he became musical director of the city's five main churches. While Telemann's career prospered, his personal life was always troubled: his first wife died only a few months after their marriage, and his second wife had extramarital affairs and accumulated a large gambling debt before leaving Telemann. Telemann was one of the most prolific composers in history (at least in terms of surviving oeuvre) and was considered by his contemporaries to be...
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Georg Philipp Telemann (14 March 1681 – 25 June 1767) was a German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist. Almost completely self-taught in music, he became a composer against his family's wishes. After studying in Magdeburg, Zellerfeld, and Hildesheim, Telemann entered the University of Leipzig to study law, but eventually settled on a career in music. He held important positions in Leipzig, Sorau, Eisenach, and Frankfurt before settling in Hamburg in 1721, where he became musical director of the city's five main churches. While Telemann's career prospered, his personal life was always troubled: his first wife died only a few months after their marriage, and his second wife had extramarital affairs and accumulated a large gambling debt before leaving Telemann.
Telemann was one of the most prolific composers in history (at least in terms of surviving oeuvre) and was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the leading German composers of the time—he was compared favorably both to his friend Johann Sebastian Bach, who made Telemann the godfather and namesake of his son Carl Philipp Emanuel, and to George Frideric Handel, whom Telemann also knew personally. Telemann's music incorporates several national styles (French, Italian) and is even at times influenced by Polish popular music. He remained at the forefront of all new musical tendencies and his music is an important link between the late Baroque and early Classical styles.

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Marc-Antoine Charpentier

Who has not heard the Eurovision TV fanfare as opening tune of joint broadcast productions? Only few know that this festive music is composed by the French Marc-Antoine Charpentier, who lived in the second half of the 17th century. Its current use has changed the aim of the piece, since it was originally meant as a hymn for God, the Latin Te Deum Laudamus, instead of a tune for a secular happening. Apart from that, Charpentier has been neglected for centuries, and has only been rediscovered as one of the greatest French composers of sacred music from the 17th century in the past decades. In any case, he is considerably more valuable in this genre than his contemporary Lully. Namely, his...
more
Who has not heard the Eurovision TV fanfare as opening tune of joint broadcast productions? Only few know that this festive music is composed by the French Marc-Antoine Charpentier, who lived in the second half of the 17th century. Its current use has changed the aim of the piece, since it was originally meant as a hymn for God, the Latin Te Deum Laudamus, instead of a tune for a secular happening.
Apart from that, Charpentier has been neglected for centuries, and has only been rediscovered as one of the greatest French composers of sacred music from the 17th century in the past decades. In any case, he is considerably more valuable in this genre than his contemporary Lully. Namely, his music betrays a greater diversity than that of Lully, often within a single work in which extremes of dignity and intimacy can be heard.
The key to this result was his adaptation of a style which was based on the Italian concerto, in which contrasts between the different parts were placed throughout the work. Furthermore, Charpentier toned down the then primarily formal and grandiose character of French music and introduced a rather Italian sensuality and a greater sensitivity to the text.
Not much is known about Charpentier’s youth. He was born in Paris and stayed in the middle of the 1660’s in Rome, where he studied with the successful oratorio composer Carissimi. Back in Paris he served a few aristocratic patrons, starting with duchesse de Guise, who was known for her piety and the excellent quality of her musical entourage, in which Charpentier sang as a countertenor and conducted.
He also succeeded Lully as composer for Molière and his plays. For instance, in 1673 he wrote the music to his last play La malade imaginaire. In the 1680’s he was at the periphery of the French court; he served the dauphin as music director and was the teacher of Philippe, Duke of Chartres (the later Duke of Orléans and Regent of France), but his illness stood in the way of his appointment as master of the Chapelle royale.
But at the same time Charpentier became composer and maître de musique of the most important Jesuit church, the St. Paul. He worked there until 1698, when he was appointed as maître de musique at the Sainte-Chapelle du palais, an even more important post.
The most striking aspect of Charpentiers sacred choral music is the refined gracefulness of his melodies and the richness of his expressive harmonies. Although a certain religious soberness sets the mood, it is luxuriant music in which the text is underlined at crucial moments and there is also ample contrast between successive episodes.
Even a large-scale, solemn work such as the Te Deum in D from the early 1690, written for the St. Paul church, is clearly split into distinct moods. It starts with the well-known trumpets and timpani, but also contains very calm, pious and intense parts, such as the soprano solo Te ergo quaesunus. In his best mass, the Missa ‘Assumpta est Maria’ , the mood is predominantly somber, but there is also diversity by using different combinations of the eight soloists.
Charpentier wrote a single full-term opera, Médée from 1693, a ‘tragédie lyrique’ after Corneille. Although the composer does not express the complex character of Medea with al her jealousy, indignation, fragility, grief, anger, malevolence, and downright barbarousness as well as Cherubini, let alone Xenakis, it is excepted that the interpreters put it forward. Consequently, success is not guaranteed.
Moreover, the taste of the audience was so decisive and the power of Lully even after his death so great that he overshadowed all others, as a result of which Charpentier’s work was only performed ten times. Les arts florissants from 1686 is a short pieces in five scenes, Actéon a ‘pastorale en musique’ from 1685 and David et Jonathas from 1688 an elaborate tragédie en musique in five acts.
Most of the other theatre works are overtures or prologues with intermèdes, intermezzi. For example, La descente d’Orphée aux enfers from 1687 is a short chamber opera after Ovid with a libretto by an unknown author. The work was only performed once and the occasion for which it had been written is also unknown. Charpentier provided the story with a happy end.
With regard to economy and concentration, the work is somewhat comparable to the opera Dido and Aeneas by Purcell, which originated around the same time. Charpentier’s work only lacks that crushing tragic feeling. It is a rather smooth, pastoral work.
(Source: Musicalifeiten.nl)
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Press

Play album Play album
01.
Prelude from 'Te Deum', H.146
01:21
(Marc-Antoine Charpentier) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
02.
Bridal March from Østerdalen
03:59
(Traditional) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
03.
Adagio from ‘Concerto in C minor’, S.Z799
04:01
(Alessandro Marcello) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
04.
Men går jag över ängarna
03:33
(Leif Strand) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
05.
Sofðu unga ástin mín
03:11
(Traditional) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
06.
Ved Rondane, Op. 33 No. 9
02:24
(Edvard Grieg) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
07.
'Heldenmusik', TWV 50:31-42: I. Die Würde – La Majesté
02:24
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
08.
'Heldenmusik', TWV 50:31-42: II. Die Anmut – La Grâce
02:52
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
09.
'Heldenmusik', TWV 50:31-42: III. Die Tapferkeit – La Vaillance
01:24
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
10.
Bridal March from Sørfold
03:46
(Traditional) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
11.
Shenandoah
04:04
(Traditional) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
12.
Rondeau from ‘Fanfares et Simphonies’
01:35
(Jean-Joseph Mouret) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
13.
Gammal fäbodpsalm från Dalarna
04:05
(Traditional, Oskar Lindberg) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
14.
Auf Flügeln des Gesanges, Op. 34 No. 2
01:52
(Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
15.
Elegy for Trumpet and Organ, Op. 27
03:20
(Øistein Sommerfeldt) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
16.
Den första gång jag såg dig
02:42
(Birger Sjöberg) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
17.
Våren, Op. 33 No. 2
04:43
(Edvard Grieg) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
18.
Suite in D major: I. Prelude, The Duke of Gloster’s March
01:25
(Jeremiah Clarke) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
19.
Suite in D major: II. Minuet
00:46
(Jeremiah Clarke) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
20.
Suite in D major: III. Sybelle
01:06
(Jeremiah Clarke) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
21.
Suite in D major: IV. Rondeau, The Prince of Denmark’s March (“Trumpet Voluntary”)
01:23
(Jeremiah Clarke) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
22.
Koppången
03:32
(Per-Erik Moraeus) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
23.
Vårsøg
03:34
(Henning Sommerro) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
24.
Solveig's Lullaby from ‘Peer Gynt’, Op. 23 No. 2
03:22
(Edvard Grieg) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
25.
Trumpet Tune in C major, ZT 678
01:15
(Henry Purcell) Kåre Nordstoga, Tine Thing Helseth
show all tracks

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