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Recorder Sonatas
Georg Philipp Telemann

Caroline Eidsten Dahl

Recorder Sonatas

Price: € 19.95
Format: CD
Label: Lawo Classics
UPC: 7090020182032
Catnr: LWC 1181
Release date: 03 January 2020
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Label
Lawo Classics
UPC
7090020182032
Catalogue number
LWC 1181
Release date
03 January 2020
Album
Artist(s)
Composer(s)
EN

About the album

GEORG PHILIPP TELEMANN (1681–1767) gained fame over much of Europe during the middle of his own life for his gallant and mixed style. In 1726, learnèd poet Christian Friedrich Weichmann (1698–1770) compared him to the greatest musicians in Venice, Rome, Paris and London (Poesie der Nieder-Sachsen, part 3) and he was to receive increasing acclaim over the next 10 years. In 1740, influential music writer Johann Mattheson asserted in his Grundlage einer Ehrenpforte that Telemann had even eclipsed the two pioneers of the era, Lully (French style) and Corelli (Italian style).

However, after his death in 1767 Telemann quickly faded into oblivion. With Viennese classical style in full bloom and soon to transform into early Romanticism, Telemann’s body of work was to become passé. The new artistic ideal was that of the sensitive genius. Later Baroque composers who had a penchant for short, gallant phrases, and who even allowed themselves to caricature nations and imitate nature and weather phenomena, no longer conformed to the musical zeitgeist. In fact, most Baroque music was past its use-by date, with only parts of Handel and Bach’s oeuvres remaining sacrosanct. Advocates of J.S Bach kept him relatively au courant by using the successful tactic of portraying him as a true genius, a scientist – a musical Isaac Newton. The still famous Telemann of 1750 seemed to see it coming when writing an obituary about his newly deceased friend Bach (in sonnet form), looking into the future and predicting that his name would never “go under”.

After World War II Telemann, and several other contemporaries such as Vivaldi, made a strong come-back and he is still recognised today as among the great talents of the 18th century. We know that he provided important impetus to the stylistic development of the early Age of Enlightenment. Norwegian music historian Harald Herresthal presents an updated view of Telemann in his 2007 book about classical music, Musikkens verden (The World of Music):
There is a lightness to Telemann’s writing, but this is not to say it is weak and insignificant music. The craftsmanship is characterised by solidity and great knowledge. With his incredible ability to absorb musical impulses, he became in many ways a stylistic chameleon. There was no other composer in Germany who, in the same way, could alternate between styles.
(page 186)


The motto “Singen ist das Fundament in Music in allen Dingen” (the first sentence in a small poem in a letter to Mattheson in 1718) aptly summarises Telemann’s fundamental principle of always adhering to the singable and melodious. In addition, he was partial to spicing it up with some cultivated folklore, most notably the “all Polacca” melodies.

Colourful instrumentation is a feature of Telemann’s oeuvre and this can especially be heard in his cantatas, operas and orchestral suites, or in his original configurations such as the Concertos for Four Violins without orchestra. Another typical feature of his work, and one which strongly appeals to musicians such as Caroline Eidsten Dahl, is his ability to compose idiomatically. This is hardly surprising, as according to his autobiographical texts, he played harpsichord, lute, violin and recorder during his childhood, and then later learned basic skills on the oboe, the transverse flute, the viola da gamba, double bass and the trombone.

As a composer, multi-instrumentalist, poet, correspondent, opera and church music director, he reached out to both scholars and to the public sphere. He ran his own publishing company in the period from 1715–40 and taught himself to engrave notes on copper plates. Telemann researchers estimate that he composed approximately 3600 works and he is well represented in all three categories in the 18th century: church, chamber and theatre music. Despite this huge output, he rarely reused his own material. This is rather unusual and is in stark contrast to his good friend Georg F. Handel, the master of recycling his own work. Handel was known to “steal” regularly, both from himself, and with permission granted, from his good friend Telemann.

Artist(s)

Caroline Eidsten Dahl (recorder)

Caroline Eidsten Dahl (b. 1980) is one of Norway’s most active recorder players. Her training took place under the auspices of Frode Thorsen at the Grieg Academy in Bergen as well as with Dan Laurin at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm, where in 2006 she completed her studies specialising in cham­ber music. Caroline is a permanent member of sev­eral ensembles including the Woodpeckers recorder quartet, Ensemble Freithoff, Bragernes Barokk and the Christian IV Consort. She performs concerts regularly throughout Norway, Sweden and Denmark, both as a chamber musician and a soloist.   In the spring of 2007 she was one of three winners of Concerts Norway’s launch program “INTRO-klassisk” for performances during the 2008–2009 season. Under the direction of Concerts...
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Caroline Eidsten Dahl (b. 1980) is one of Norway’s most active recorder players. Her training took place under the auspices of Frode Thorsen at the Grieg Academy in Bergen as well as with Dan Laurin at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm, where in 2006 she completed her studies specialising in cham­ber music. Caroline is a permanent member of sev­eral ensembles including the Woodpeckers recorder quartet, Ensemble Freithoff, Bragernes Barokk and the Christian IV Consort. She performs concerts regularly throughout Norway, Sweden and Denmark, both as a chamber musician and a soloist.
In the spring of 2007 she was one of three winners of Concerts Norway’s launch program “INTRO-klassisk” for performances during the 2008–2009 season. Under the direction of Concerts Norway, she travelled to India and China performing Norwegian and Chinese music with musicians from Shanghai.
Caroline has performed at numerous festivals includ­ing the Innsbruck Festival of Early Music, where she played with Academia Montis Regalis, the Early Mu­sic Festival in London, Stockholm Early Music Festi­val, Oslo Early, the Stavanger International Chamber Music Festival, and the Oslo International Church Music Festival.
2014 saw the release of Caroline’s debut solo album Blockbird – Norwegian Recorder Music (LWC1069) on the LAWO Classics label, receiving rave reviews both on the home front and abroad. This was followed in 2018 by the release of Sonata Norwegica (LWC1165) on the same label, featuring Norwegian and Swedish baroque music. In 2019 she released Telemann Re­corder Sonatas (LWC1181) with cellist Kate Hearne and cembalist Christian Kjos.
Caroline received the Arts Council of Norway’s scholarship for newly established artists for a two-year period from 2010 to 2012.

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Kate Hearne (cello)

Christian Kjos (harpsichord)

Composer(s)

Georg Philipp Telemann

Georg Philipp Telemann (14 March 1681 – 25 June 1767) was a German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist. Almost completely self-taught in music, he became a composer against his family's wishes. After studying in Magdeburg, Zellerfeld, and Hildesheim, Telemann entered the University of Leipzig to study law, but eventually settled on a career in music. He held important positions in Leipzig, Sorau, Eisenach, and Frankfurt before settling in Hamburg in 1721, where he became musical director of the city's five main churches. While Telemann's career prospered, his personal life was always troubled: his first wife died only a few months after their marriage, and his second wife had extramarital affairs and accumulated a large gambling debt before leaving Telemann. Telemann was one of the most prolific composers in history (at least in terms of surviving oeuvre) and was considered by his contemporaries to be...
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Georg Philipp Telemann (14 March 1681 – 25 June 1767) was a German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist. Almost completely self-taught in music, he became a composer against his family's wishes. After studying in Magdeburg, Zellerfeld, and Hildesheim, Telemann entered the University of Leipzig to study law, but eventually settled on a career in music. He held important positions in Leipzig, Sorau, Eisenach, and Frankfurt before settling in Hamburg in 1721, where he became musical director of the city's five main churches. While Telemann's career prospered, his personal life was always troubled: his first wife died only a few months after their marriage, and his second wife had extramarital affairs and accumulated a large gambling debt before leaving Telemann.
Telemann was one of the most prolific composers in history (at least in terms of surviving oeuvre) and was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the leading German composers of the time—he was compared favorably both to his friend Johann Sebastian Bach, who made Telemann the godfather and namesake of his son Carl Philipp Emanuel, and to George Frideric Handel, whom Telemann also knew personally. Telemann's music incorporates several national styles (French, Italian) and is even at times influenced by Polish popular music. He remained at the forefront of all new musical tendencies and his music is an important link between the late Baroque and early Classical styles.

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01.
Sonatina in C minor, TWV 41:c2: I. Largo
01:32
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
02.
Sonatina in C minor, TWV 41:c2: II. Allegro
01:29
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
03.
Sonatina in C minor, TWV 41:c2: III. Dolce
02:23
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
04.
Sonatina in C minor, TWV 41:c2: IV. Vivace
01:40
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
05.
Sonatina in A minor, TWV 41:a4: I. Andante
02:24
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
06.
Sonatina in A minor, TWV 41:a4: II. Allegro
01:48
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
07.
Sonatina in A minor, TWV 41:a4: III. Andante
02:15
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
08.
Sonatina in A minor, TWV 41:a4: IV. Presto
01:43
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
09.
Sonata in C major, TWV 41:C2: I. Cantabile
01:18
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
10.
Sonata in C major, TWV 41:C2: II. Allegro
01:50
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
11.
Sonata in C major, TWV 41:C2: III. Grave
01:19
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
12.
Sonata in C major, TWV 41:C2: IV. Vivace
01:59
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
13.
Sonata in F minor, TWV 41:f1: I. Triste
01:53
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
14.
Sonata in F minor, TWV 41:f1: II. Allegro
03:37
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
15.
Sonata in F minor, TWV 41:f1: III. Andante
01:28
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
16.
Sonata in F minor, TWV 41:f1: IV. Vivace
01:57
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
17.
Sonata in F major, TWV 41:F2: I. Vivace
02:07
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
18.
Sonata in F major, TWV 41:F2: II. Largo
01:50
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
19.
Sonata in F major, TWV 41:F2: III. Allegro
01:31
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
20.
Sonata in B major, TWV 41:B3: I. Largo
01:20
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
21.
Sonata in B major, TWV 41:B3: II. Allegro
01:50
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
22.
Sonata in B major, TWV 41:B3: III. Largo
01:26
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
23.
Sonata in B major, TWV 41:B3: IV. Vivace
01:47
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
24.
Sonata in C major, TWV 41:C5: I. Adagio – Allegro – Adagio – Allegro
02:19
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
25.
Sonata in C major, TWV 41:C5: II. Larghetto
01:40
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
26.
Sonata in C major, TWV 41:C5: III. Vivace
02:37
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
27.
Sonata in D minor, TWV 41:d4: I. Affettuoso
01:47
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
28.
Sonata in D minor, TWV 41:d4: II. Presto
03:10
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
29.
Sonata in D minor, TWV 41:d4: III. Grave
00:46
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
30.
Sonata in D minor, TWV 41:d4: IV. Allegro
02:53
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
31.
Sonata in F minor, TWV 41:f2: I. Adagio
02:13
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
32.
Sonata in F minor, TWV 41:f2: II. Allegro
01:32
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
33.
Sonata in F minor, TWV 41:f2: III. Adagio
01:37
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
34.
Sonata in F minor, TWV 41:f2: IV. Gigue
01:11
(Georg Philipp Telemann) Caroline Eidsten Dahl, Kate Hearne, Christian Kjos
show all tracks

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