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Mythes

Jiyoon Lee

Mythes

Price: € 19.95
Format: CD
Label: Champs Hill
UPC: 5060212591487
Catnr: CHRCD 141
Release date: 07 September 2018
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Label
Champs Hill
UPC
5060212591487
Catalogue number
CHRCD 141
Release date
07 September 2018
Album
Artist(s)
Composer(s)
EN
NL

About the album

As part of her prize for winning the Windsor Festival International Strings Competition in 2015, South Korean violinist Jiyoon Lee makes her debut recording on Champs Hill Records with duo partner Henry Kramer in a recital of Stravinsky, Wieniawski, Bartok, Szymanowski and Ravel. · Winning the David Oistrakh competition in 2013, Jiyoon Lee subsequently won prizes in the Indianapolis, Queen Elizabeth and Carl Nielsen competitions, in addition to Windsor, and is now performing around the world. Henry Kramer has similarly won prizes in the Queen Elizabeth and Montreal competitions and an award winner at the Julliard School.

Jiyoon Lee about the album: "The “Mythes” album is all about feelings, emotions and imagination which are the most crucial elements of music-making. The entire process of recording this disc with the one and only Henry Kramer has been a pure joy, and I sincerely hope it will lead you to a journey full of adventures and fantasies."

Dit debuutalbum van de Zuid-Koreaanse violiste Jiyoon Lee, begeleid door de Amerikaanse pianist Henry Kramer, maakt onderdeel uit van haar prijs voor het winnen van de Windsor International Strings Competition in 2015, met een recital van Stravinsky, Wieniawski, Bartok, Szymanowski en Ravel. Wat een fantastisch gevoelig spel van deze violiste die alom geprezen wordt om haar virtuositeit. En vlak ook de adequate en zo zeer passende begeleiding van de pianist niet uit.

Album vol gevoelens en emoties
Jiyoon Lee: “Het album Mythes gaat over gevoelens, emoties en verbeelding, de meest cruciale elementen van het musiceren. Het volledige opnameproces met de enige echte Henry Kramer was een groot genoegen, en ik hoop oprecht dat het je naar een reis vol avonturen en fantasieën zal leiden.”

Een serieuze winnaar
Jiyoon Lee kwam voor het eerst in de aandacht toen ze in 2013 de David Oistrakh International Violin Competition won. Waarna ze vervolgens heel wat eerste prijzen in de wacht sleepte zoals die van de Indianapolis Violin Competition en de Queen Elizabeth en Carl Nielsen Violin Competitions. De violiste treedt overal ter wereld op, net als Henry Kramer die ook diverse grote prijzen won. Bovendien werd hij bekroond met een onderscheiding van de legendarische Julliard School in New York.

Artist(s)

Jiyoon Lee (violin)

South Korean violinist Jiyoon Lee is rapidly building an international reputation as an emerging young soloist, winning praise for her confident, communicative and soulful playing and for her natural poise as a concerto soloist. Jiyoon’s talent and endeavour in violin are decorated with numerous prizes and distinctions throughout her career.  Jiyoon Lee is an aspiring soloist, performing with renowned orchestras ranging from the Philharmonia Orchestra, Orchestre National de Belgique, Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, Swedish Chamber Orchestra, Odense Symphony Orchestra, Poznan Philharmonic Orchestra, Navarra Symphony Orchestra, Orquestra de Cámara Galega, ECCO Ensemble, Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra, KBS Orchestra and Korean Symphony Orchestra and has collaborated with prestigious musicians including Nikolaj Znaider, Marin Alsop, Jac van Steen and Martin Fröst. She has performed in Berliner...
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South Korean violinist Jiyoon Lee is rapidly building an international reputation as an emerging young soloist, winning praise for her confident, communicative and soulful playing and for her natural poise as a concerto soloist. Jiyoon’s talent and endeavour in violin are decorated with numerous prizes and distinctions throughout her career. Jiyoon Lee is an aspiring soloist, performing with renowned orchestras ranging from the Philharmonia Orchestra, Orchestre National de Belgique, Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, Swedish Chamber Orchestra, Odense Symphony Orchestra, Poznan Philharmonic Orchestra, Navarra Symphony Orchestra, Orquestra de Cámara Galega, ECCO Ensemble, Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra, KBS Orchestra and Korean Symphony Orchestra and has collaborated with prestigious musicians including Nikolaj Znaider, Marin Alsop, Jac van Steen and Martin Fröst. She has performed in Berliner Philharmonie, Konzerthaus Berlin, Wigmore Hall, Tonhalle Zurich, Bozar Brussels and Bolshoy Hall.
Born in 1992 in Seoul, her career as a violinist commenced at the age of four. At the age of only 24, she became the first concertmaster of Staatskapelle Berlin and regularly works with world renowned conductors such as Daniel Barenboim, Zubin Mehta, and Christoph von Dohnányi. Jiyoon Lee plays a violin by C. Landolfi on generous loan from the Deutsch Stiftung Musikleben in Hamburg.

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Henry Kramer (piano)

Pianist Henry Kramer is establishing himself as one of the most exciting American musicians of his generation. His performances have been praised by critics as “triumphant” and “thrilling” (The New York Times), and “technically effortless” (La Presse, Montreal).  Henry has been invited to play with orchestras across the globe including the National Belgian Orchestra, Brussels Philharmonic, Calgary Philharmonic, Shanghai Philharmonic, Bilkent Symphony Orchestra in Ankara, Turkey, the Portland (Maine) Symphony Orchestra, the Orchestre Métropolitain du Montreal, and the Yale Philharmonia. He has soloed under the batons of preeminent conductors Marin Alsop, Jan Pascal Tortelier, and Stéphane Dénève.  Mr. Kramer has been a guest performer in recitals at Portland Piano International (Oregon), The Cliburn Foundation, and the National Chopin Foundation in Miami and in important venues...
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Pianist Henry Kramer is establishing himself as one of the most exciting American musicians of his generation. His performances have been praised by critics as “triumphant” and “thrilling” (The New York Times), and “technically effortless” (La Presse, Montreal).

Henry has been invited to play with orchestras across the globe including the National Belgian Orchestra, Brussels Philharmonic, Calgary Philharmonic, Shanghai Philharmonic, Bilkent Symphony Orchestra in Ankara, Turkey, the Portland (Maine) Symphony Orchestra, the Orchestre Métropolitain du Montreal, and the Yale Philharmonia. He has soloed under the batons of preeminent conductors Marin Alsop, Jan Pascal Tortelier, and Stéphane Dénève.

Mr. Kramer has been a guest performer in recitals at Portland Piano International (Oregon), The Cliburn Foundation, and the National Chopin Foundation in Miami and in important venues like Carnegie Hall (Zankel and Wiell), the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Queen Elizabeth Hall in Antwerp (Belgium) and BOZAR in Brussels. Deeply committed to the chamber music repertoire, he has been featured in performances at Lincoln Center, and has participated in the Steans Institute at the Ravinia Festival, La Jolla Music Society’s Summerfest, Music@Menlo’s International Program, and the Verbier Festival Academy.


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Composer(s)

Henryk Wieniawski

Wieniawski was a Polish composer. Even though he came from a jewish family, his father converted to catholocism. Wieniawski's violin talent was quickly discovere, in 1843 he attended the conservatory of Paris at the age of 8. After he graduated, Wieniawski went on tour giving many recitals. He was often accompanied by his brother, Józef. In 1847, he published his first work, the Grand Caprice Fantastique.  On invitation by Anton Rubinstein, Wieniawski moved to St. Petersburg where he stayed until 1872. There, he taught a large number of violin students, led the Russian Musical Society's orchestra and string quartet. Fro, 1872 to 1874, Wieniawski toured throughout the United States together with Rubinstein and in 1875, he replaced Henri Vieuxtemps as a violin teacher at the conservatory of...
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Wieniawski was a Polish composer. Even though he came from a jewish family, his father converted to catholocism. Wieniawski's violin talent was quickly discovere, in 1843 he attended the conservatory of Paris at the age of 8. After he graduated, Wieniawski went on tour giving many recitals. He was often accompanied by his brother, Józef. In 1847, he published his first work, the Grand Caprice Fantastique.

On invitation by Anton Rubinstein, Wieniawski moved to St. Petersburg where he stayed until 1872. There, he taught a large number of violin students, led the Russian Musical Society's orchestra and string quartet. Fro, 1872 to 1874, Wieniawski toured throughout the United States together with Rubinstein and in 1875, he replaced Henri Vieuxtemps as a violin teacher at the conservatory of Brussels. In Brussels, his health declined fast, which at one time forced him to stop a performance midway through. He gave his farewell concert in 1879. A year later he died from a heart attack in Moscow.


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Maurice Ravel

Joseph Maurice Ravel was a French composer who is often associated with impressionism along with his elder contemporary Claude Debussy, although both composers rejected the term. In the 1920s and 1930s Ravel was internationally regarded as France's greatest living composer. Born to a music-loving family, Ravel attended France's premier music college, the Paris Conservatoire; he was not well regarded by its conservative establishment, whose biased treatment of him caused a scandal. After leaving the Conservatoire Ravel found his own way as a composer, developing a style of great clarity, incorporating elements of baroque, neoclassicism and, in his later works, jazz. He liked to experiment with musical form, as in his best-known work, Boléro (1928), in which repetition takes the place of...
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Joseph Maurice Ravel was a French composer who is often associated with impressionism along with his elder contemporary Claude Debussy, although both composers rejected the term. In the 1920s and 1930s Ravel was internationally regarded as France's greatest living composer.
Born to a music-loving family, Ravel attended France's premier music college, the Paris Conservatoire; he was not well regarded by its conservative establishment, whose biased treatment of him caused a scandal. After leaving the Conservatoire Ravel found his own way as a composer, developing a style of great clarity, incorporating elements of baroque, neoclassicism and, in his later works, jazz. He liked to experiment with musical form, as in his best-known work, Boléro (1928), in which repetition takes the place of development. He made some orchestral arrangements of other composers' music, of which his 1922 version of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition is the best known.
As a slow and painstaking worker, Ravel composed fewer pieces than many of his contemporaries. Among his works to enter the repertoire are pieces for piano, chamber music, two piano concertos, ballet music, two operas, and eight song cycles; he wrote no symphonies and only one religious work. Many of his works exist in two versions: a first, piano score and a later orchestration. Some of his piano music, such as Gaspard de la nuit (1908), is exceptionally difficult to play, and his complex orchestral works such as Daphnis et Chloé (1912) require skilful balance in performance.

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Béla Bartók

Next to Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinsky, Béla Bartók was a third seminal innovator of European art music at the start of the twentieth century. Bartók, too, sought a way out of the deadlock of tonal music around 1900, and he found it in folk music. Initially, he tied in with the nationalistic tradition of Franz Liszt with his tone poem Kossuth, but eventually he found his own voice with the rediscovery of the music of Hungarian peasants. Together with Zoltán Kodály he was one of the first to apply the results of folkloric research into his own compositions. One major difference between him and composers of the 19th century, was that Bartók did not adjust to the system of tonality, but created...
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Next to Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinsky, Béla Bartók was a third seminal innovator of European art music at the start of the twentieth century. Bartók, too, sought a way out of the deadlock of tonal music around 1900, and he found it in folk music. Initially, he tied in with the nationalistic tradition of Franz Liszt with his tone poem Kossuth, but eventually he found his own voice with the rediscovery of the music of Hungarian peasants. Together with Zoltán Kodály he was one of the first to apply the results of folkloric research into his own compositions. One major difference between him and composers of the 19th century, was that Bartók did not adjust to the system of tonality, but created his own musical idiom from folk music. Because of this, his composition style was flexible to other musical trends, without having to violate his own view points. For example, his two Violin sonates come close to Schoenberg's free expressionism, and after 1926 his music started to show neoclassicistic tendencies, comparable to Stravinsky's music. Bartók was not just interested in Hungarian folk music, but could appreciate musical folklore from all of the Balkan, Turkey and North-Africa as well.
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Igor Stravinsky

Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. He is widely considered one of the most important and influential composers of the 20th century.   Stravinsky's compositional career was notable for its stylistic diversity. He first achieved international fame with three ballets commissioned by the impresario Sergei Diaghilev and first performed in Paris by Diaghilev's Ballets Russes: The Firebird (1910), Petrushka (1911) and The Rite of Spring (1913). The last of these transformed the way in which subsequent composers thought about rhythmic structure and was largely responsible for Stravinsky's enduring reputation as a musical revolutionary who pushed the boundaries of musical design. His 'Russian phase' which continued with works such as Renard, The Soldier's Tale and Les Noces, was followed...
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Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. He is widely considered one of the most important and influential composers of the 20th century.
Stravinsky's compositional career was notable for its stylistic diversity. He first achieved international fame with three ballets commissioned by the impresario Sergei Diaghilev and first performed in Paris by Diaghilev's Ballets Russes: The Firebird (1910), Petrushka (1911) and The Rite of Spring (1913). The last of these transformed the way in which subsequent composers thought about rhythmic structure and was largely responsible for Stravinsky's enduring reputation as a musical revolutionary who pushed the boundaries of musical design. His "Russian phase" which continued with works such as Renard, The Soldier's Tale and Les Noces, was followed in the 1920s by a period in which he turned to neoclassical music. The works from this period tended to make use of traditional musical forms (concerto grosso, fugue and symphony), drawing on earlier styles, especially from the 18th century. This style was often referred to as Neoclassicism. In the 1950s, Stravinsky adopted serial procedures. His compositions of this period shared traits with examples of his earlier output: rhythmic energy, the construction of extended melodic ideas out of a few two- or three-note cells and clarity of form, and of instrumentation.

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Karol Szymanowski

Karol Szymanowski was a Polish composer and pianist, the most celebrated Polish composer of the early 20th century. He is considered a member of the late 19th-/early 20th-century modernist movement Young Poland and widely viewed as one of the greatest Polish composers. The early works show the influence of the late Romantic German school as well as the early works of Alexander Scriabin, as exemplified by his Étude Op. 4 No. 3 and his first two symphonies. Later, he developed an impressionistic and partially atonal style, represented by such works as the Third Symphony and his Violin Concerto No. 1. His third period was influenced by the folk music of the Polish Górale people, including the ballet Harnasie, the Fourth Symphony,...
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Karol Szymanowski was a Polish composer and pianist, the most celebrated Polish composer of the early 20th century. He is considered a member of the late 19th-/early 20th-century modernist movement Young Poland and widely viewed as one of the greatest Polish composers.
The early works show the influence of the late Romantic German school as well as the early works of Alexander Scriabin, as exemplified by his Étude Op. 4 No. 3 and his first two symphonies. Later, he developed an impressionistic and partially atonal style, represented by such works as the Third Symphony and his Violin Concerto No. 1. His third period was influenced by the folk music of the Polish Górale people, including the ballet Harnasie, the Fourth Symphony, and his sets of Mazurkas for piano. King Roger, composed between 1918-1924, remains the most popular opera by Szymanowski. His other significant works include opera Hagith, Symphony No. 2, The Love Songs of Hafiz, and Stabat Mater.
He was awarded the highest national honors, including the Officer's Cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta, the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland and other distinctions, both Polish and foreign.[1]
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