Eric Vloeimans' Oliver's Cinema

Oliver's Cinema

Format: SACD hybrid
Label: Buzz
UPC: 0608917611120
Catnr: ZZ 76111
Release date: 06 September 2013
1 SACD hybrid
 
Label
Buzz
UPC
0608917611120
Catalogue number
ZZ 76111
Release date
06 September 2013

"More Intriguing Music From Eric Vloeimans - another excellent Bert van der Wolf recording"

Positive Feedback, 02-2-2022
Album
Artist(s)
Composer(s)
Press
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DE

About the album

How Oliver’s Cinema came about

"I used to think the accordion was a horrible instrument. An ugly, kitschy sound and a repertoire to match, from commercial tripe and oompah to waltzes for the elderly and circus drollery. In short, music to be given a wide berth. But developments never cease, and you suddenly notice that your opinion has changed. After years and years of studying music, mind you. Your taste buds change. It’s just like with buttermilk, olives and tomatoes. As a child you hated them, and now you find you enjoy the taste. After thorough education at the dinner table, by the way. Trying a little bit, time and again.

Incidentally, there are plenty of listeners who feel that mine is a horrible instrument. Loud, shrill, ugly, militaristic. Think of the Brouwer Brothers, Willy Schobben, Marty and all those other guys with their Golden Trumpets, playing Il Silencio and O mein Papa. I used to like that, but not anymore. Yes, taste remains a complex business.

Back to the accordion. During one of my musical wanderings I wound up in the Belgian town of Rijkevorsel. After a concert there I was having a pint at the bar, and in this lovely Belgian atmosphere the accordion question reared its head again. Was there no accordion player to be found in Belgium that would suit me? ‘But certainly’, the response was, ‘you want our Tuur, then!’ A CD of his was put on forthwith, and the wonderful improvisations by Tuur Florizoone enchanted me on the spot. An appointment with Tuur was quickly made. One phone call, and it was like meeting my brother. This was the beginning of a new duo, that by now can look back on a long series of successful concerts.

There’s another instrument I’m completely in love with – the cello. A sensual instrument, that can take over the task of a bass, but remains light and svelte. A bowed melody on the cello sounds gorgeous, like on a heavier viola, but still agile and pert. And now I’m not only a fan of the instrument, but also of someone who plays it magnificently. He knows his classics, plucks like a jazz virtuoso, bows like a prince, and doesn’t shy away from electronics either. He’s from our neighboring country Germany, and his name is Jörg Brinkmann.

Can you imagine the glorious music the meeting between Tuur and Jörg would produce? The thought wouldn’t let go of me. The first occasion that presented itself was a concert at a beautiful open air theatre in Kersouwe, Brabant. Everyone brought their sheet music, we rehearsed right there for two hours, and then went on stage straight away – you can discover the greatest things when you’re put on the spot.

Tuur brought the music he’d written for a documentary about mussels, l’Amour des Moules. Jörg came up with Fellini’s Waltz, and my contribution consisted of music I’d composed for Majesteit, and the themes from the movies Rosemary’s Baby and Cinema Paradiso. Without any conferring beforehand, this all came together wonderfully. A great gift, as was the performance that turned out fantastically well. I gained another brother on the spot ☺and a new trio was born right there and then.

How do you find a name for a new trio? After much brainstorming, I fooled around with anagrams. And you guessed it, another great gift: Eric Vloeimans = Oliver’s Cinema."
How Oliver’s Cinema came about

"I used to think the accordion was a horrible instrument. An ugly, kitschy sound and a repertoire to match, from commercial tripe and oompah to waltzes for the elderly and circus drollery. In short, music to be given a wide berth. But developments never cease, and you suddenly notice that your opinion has changed. After years and years of studying music, mind you. Your taste buds change. It’s just like with buttermilk, olives and tomatoes. As a child you hated them, and now you find you enjoy the taste. After thorough education at the dinner table, by the way. Trying a little bit, time and again.

Incidentally, there are plenty of listeners who feel that mine is a horrible instrument. Loud, shrill, ugly, militaristic. Think of the Brouwer Brothers, Willy Schobben, Marty and all those other guys with their Golden Trumpets, playing Il Silencio and O mein Papa. I used to like that, but not anymore. Yes, taste remains a complex business.

Back to the accordion. During one of my musical wanderings I wound up in the Belgian town of Rijkevorsel. After a concert there I was having a pint at the bar, and in this lovely Belgian atmosphere the accordion question reared its head again. Was there no accordion player to be found in Belgium that would suit me? ‘But certainly’, the response was, ‘you want our Tuur, then!’ A CD of his was put on forthwith, and the wonderful improvisations by Tuur Florizoone enchanted me on the spot. An appointment with Tuur was quickly made. One phone call, and it was like meeting my brother. This was the beginning of a new duo, that by now can look back on a long series of successful concerts.

There’s another instrument I’m completely in love with – the cello. A sensual instrument, that can take over the task of a bass, but remains light and svelte. A bowed melody on the cello sounds gorgeous, like on a heavier viola, but still agile and pert. And now I’m not only a fan of the instrument, but also of someone who plays it magnificently. He knows his classics, plucks like a jazz virtuoso, bows like a prince, and doesn’t shy away from electronics either. He’s from our neighboring country Germany, and his name is Jörg Brinkmann.

Can you imagine the glorious music the meeting between Tuur and Jörg would produce? The thought wouldn’t let go of me. The first occasion that presented itself was a concert at a beautiful open air theatre in Kersouwe, Brabant. Everyone brought their sheet music, we rehearsed right there for two hours, and then went on stage straight away – you can discover the greatest things when you’re put on the spot.

Tuur brought the music he’d written for a documentary about mussels, l’Amour des Moules. Jörg came up with Fellini’s Waltz, and my contribution consisted of music I’d composed for Majesteit, and the themes from the movies Rosemary’s Baby and Cinema Paradiso. Without any conferring beforehand, this all came together wonderfully. A great gift, as was the performance that turned out fantastically well. I gained another brother on the spot ☺and a new trio was born right there and then.

How do you find a name for a new trio? After much brainstorming, I fooled around with anagrams. And you guessed it, another great gift: Eric Vloeimans = Oliver’s Cinema."

Artist(s)

Eric Vloeimans
Eric Vloeimans (Huizen, 1963) is an improvising trumpeter and composer who regards the term ‘jazz’ as too limiting to describe his music. His work is characterized by melodic and lyrical power, and a distinctive, individual sound that is called velvety or whispering in the more subdued pieces.

Between 1982 and 1988, Vloeimans studied at the Rotterdam Conservatory; classical trumpet at first, later the jazz course. In 1989 he took lessons in the US with Donald Byrd and formed part of the big bands of Frank Foster and Mercer Ellington.

In the early Nineties Vloeimans was regarded as a member of a younger generation of musicians who combine bebop with influences from rock and free improvisation, such as Michiel Borstlap, Benjamin Herman and Yuri Honing.

In 1998, the Edison-winning Bitches and Fairy Tales was released, recorded with pianist John Taylor, bassist Marc Johnson and drummer Joey Baron. Taylor is also featured on Umai from 2000. In 2001, Vloeimans won the coveted Boy Edgar Prize, and in 2001 the Bird Award of the North Sea Jazz Festival. The CD’s VoizNoiz 3 (with Michel Banabila, 2003), Summersault (with Fugimundi, 2006) and Gatecrashin’ (with Gatecrash, 2007) were also awarded Edisons. In addition, Eric was recipient of the Elly Ameling Prize as well as the Golden Nutcracker (2011)

From 2006/2007 Eric Vloeimans has been active with two much-praised formations: the chamber jazz trio Fugimundi (Anton Goudsmit guitar, Harmen Fraanje piano) and the electric band Gatecrash, in which rock and funk elements can be traced (Jeroen van Vliet keyboards, Gulli Gudmundsson bass, Jasper van Hulten drums). With the latter group, he employs electronic effects in his trumpet playing for the first time.

In addition, he continues to develop other projects, such as the band Oliver’s Cinema with accordion player Tuur Florizoone and cellist Jörg Brinkmann (CD available from August 2013, and a US tour in October 2014)) , and a duo with pianist Florian Weber, with a CD release : Live at the Concertgebouw in 2011.

His broad range of interests has led Vloeimans to collaborate with artists from other musical worlds. In the pop music area, these include Fay Lovsky, Doe Maar, Spinvis, Jan Akkerman and trumpeter Kyteman (Colin Benders). Kytecrash, the combination of the latter’s hip-hop band and Gatecrash, resulted in successful performances and a CD in 2011. He will be performing a series of concerts with British classical pianist Joanna MacGregor in the winter of 2013/2014.

Where world music is concerned, Vloeimans was involved in projects with flamenco guitarist Eric Vaarzon Morel, Latin pianist Ramon Valle, and the fado-inspired Pessoa of Fernando Lameirinhas.

Vloeimans has performed as a soloist with classical ensembles such as the Matangi Quartet, the Calefax Reed Quintet, the Metropole Orchestra, the Gelderland Orchestra, the Limburg Symphony Orchestra, the Holland Baroque Society, the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra. 2011 saw the premiere of his first trumpet concerto, Evensong, with the Limburg Symphony Orchestra, orchestrated by Martin Fondse, and recorded for CD with the Netherlands Symphony Orchestra. Eric Vloeimans is also artistic director of the 2013 National Youth Jazz Orchestra.

May 2013

Tuur Florizoone
Although in the Low Countries the accordion is often still associated with corniness and banal hi-jinx, in other cultures it has been a fully respected instrument with a great expressive range for many years. Especially in the hands of a composer and improviser with imagination and taste, such as one of Belgium’s most beloved musicians, Tuur Florizoone. This has everything to do with his broad knowledge and interests, his charisma and tangible joy in performing, and his gift for touching the heart of the music as well as that of the listeners.

Florizoone (1978) has had classical piano lessons and studied jazz piano and composition at the conservatory. He gained some of his practical experience in Brazil, such as at the workshops of the great percussionist Nana Vasconcelos, and by accompanying circus, dance and theatre shows. He collaborated with heavyweights from the worlds of jazz (Philip Catherine, Garrett List), pop music (Stijn Meuris, Thé Lau), classical music (Claron McFadden, the Brussels Philharmonic) and the folk and world music scene (Luka Bloom, Carlos Nuñes). He demonstrated his mastery of mood and atmosphere, based on simple, directly appealing material, in film soundtracks such as Aanrijding in Moscou – which won him the public prize at the WORLD SOUNDTRACK AWARDS 2008 – and L’Amour des Moules. As an improviser, he’s at his best in open situations with a lot of freedom and interaction, like in the group Tricycle, the collective trio Massot/Florizoone/Horbaczewski, and in a duo with diatonic accordionist Didier Laloy.

Jörg Brinkmann
Young, classically trained string players with big, wide open ears have greatly enriched Dutch improvised music in the past years. One of them is the German cellist Jörg Brinkmann (1976), who has studied at the Arnhem conservatory. Just like the members of the ZAPP! string quartet, whom he frequently plays with, he get his inspiration from anywhere; for him the ‘jazz’ label is also too limiting. Brinkmann is equally capable of making essential contributions to pop bands, theatre orchestras or chamber music ensembles. Building on the technical innovations of improvising jazz musicians, he can deploy his cello as a (rhythm) guitar, or as a bass that lays down funk accents or swings in four-four time. When he colors the sound of his instrument with electronics, it’s done in a subtle and tasteful way. In his playing and his compositions a perfect fusion takes place of structure and personal variations, of cleanly bowed lyricism and lively rhythms, in which he doesn’t shy away from unusual time signatures either.

His musical character is faithfully expressed in his own trio with pianist Oliver Maas and percussionist Dirk-Peter Kölsch, with whom he recorded the album Ha! for ACT. In addition, he’s worked with Martin Fondse’s Starvinsky Orkestar, Michiel Braam’s Bik Bent Braam and many other adventurous jazz soloists.

Composer(s)

Press

More Intriguing Music From Eric Vloeimans - another excellent Bert van der Wolf recording
Positive Feedback, 02-2-2022

"On the aural end, it should simply be noted that Eric Vloeimans' Oliver's Cinema creates beautiful and heartfelt music that touches the soul"
all about jazz, 15-10-2014


Telegraaf, 23-8-2014

Only three musicians, who where able to get two thousand people noiseless (Jazzflits over the concert of Oliver's Cinema on Norht Sea Jazz Festival 2014)
Jazzflits, 28-7-2014

...deserves five stars for its sheer ingenuity as well as its vanity...
Marlbank.net, 26-6-2014


Jazzism, 01-6-2014

Very successful album!
Written in Music, 04-5-2014

An outstandig project, you should listen to at rest.
Jazzpodium, 01-3-2014

It’s as if these tones don’t just touch your hearing, but every one of your senses.
Blogspot, 01-1-2014

With their brand new but nostalgic sounding music they had an effortless full house 
Jazzflits , 16-12-2013

"An album that will surprise and moreish and will fascinate a large group of musiclovers. Beautiful!"
keepitswinging.blogspot.nl, 06-12-2013

Geen quote, niet perse positief
Jazz Bulletin, 02-12-2013

"A special CD, full of atmosphere"
www.rootstime.be, 29-11-2013

"If there is a musician who is not suffering from a parochialism, is it jazz trumpeter Eric Vloeimans. Recently, two phenomenally beautiful albums were released on which he can be heard with a baroque orchestra, respectively, and in trio with accordion and cello"
www.nadelunch.com, 18-11-2013

"The result is thrilling music with a lot in mind: it’s exciting, adventurous and varied"
www.musicframes.nl, 18-11-2013

"The accordion adds a distinctive French twist, the cello picks and strikes and Eric Vloeimans' trumpet sounds always beautiful"
Nederlands Dagblad, 15-11-2013


Jazzism , 01-11-2013

This CD is made with lots of love and attention. There is an atmosphere of peace that sometimes can be interpret as alsmost silence. Music with a rich palette of sound and beauty, which can encourage to contemplate.
Draai Om Je Oren, 31-10-2013

Everything is right about this album
Jazzflits, 14-10-2013

"In one word Brilliant"
www.opusklassiek.nl, 08-10-2013

Genre boundaries do not exist. Impossible combinations do not exist either. 
Limburgs Dagblad, 30-9-2013

4-star review **** "The timbre of the cello and accordion contain colors that evoke nostalgic warmth and sadness, but also a fine hint of hope. Together with Vloeimans' long, hot fire trumpet sounds, the cinematic grandeur of Oliver's Cinema is complete."
De Volkskrant, 23-9-2013

"The occupation is special, with cellist Jörg Brinkmann and flamboyant accordionist Tuur Florizoone, particularly popular in his country Flanders"
Jazzbulletin, 19-9-2013

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