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German Harpsichord Music before Bach

Jacques Ogg

German Harpsichord Music before Bach

Format: CD
Label: Globe
UPC: 8711525504707
Catnr: GLO 5047
Release date: 19 August 2002
1 CD
 
Label
Globe
UPC
8711525504707
Catalogue number
GLO 5047
Release date
19 August 2002
Album
Artist(s)
Composer(s)
NL

About the album

Een ongelooflijk mooie en uitgebreide samenvatting van de klavecimbelwerken voor Bach
Opnieuw een belangrijke uitgave op het gebied van oude muziek, met een programma dat een veel uitgebreidere samenvatting van het ongelooflijk hoge niveau van klaviercomposities in het Duitsland voor Bach geeft dan albums die zich enkel en alleen richten op werken van grote componisten als Froberger en Buxtehude.

De meeste albums met klavecimbelwerken richten zich op werken van één componist, maar uit internationale recensies blijkt dat een groeiende interesse is voor recitals zoals die op dit album, vanwege de muzikale variatie.

Ook al zijn er nauwelijks originele Duitse klavecimbels uit deze periode overgeleverd, het is desondanks toch gelukt de originele klankidealen zo dicht mogelijk te benaderen door het gebruik van fantastische kopieën van vroege 18e-eeuwse Duitse klavecimbels. Een van hen werd speciaal voor deze opnames gebouwd door de beroemde Joop Klinkhamer uit Amsterdam.

De muziek wordt uitgevoerd door Jacques Ogg. Hij studeerde onder Anneke Uittenbosch en Gustav Leonhardt aan het Sweelinck Conservatorium Amsterdam. Hij treedt over de hele wereld op als klavecinist en fortepianist en geeft regelmatig masterclasses. Hij is inmiddels bekend onder liefhebbers van klavecimbelmuziek. Zowel de klank van de opnames als de verrukkelijke uitvoeringen van Ogg moeten gehoord worden om ze te kunnen geloven!

Artist(s)

Composer(s)

Georg Muffat

Georg Muffat was born in Megève, Duchy of Savoy (now in France), and was of Scottish descent. He studied in Paris between 1663 and 1669, where his teacher is often assumed to have been Jean Baptiste Lully. This assumption is largely based on the statement 'For six years ... I avidly pursued this style which was flowering in Paris at the time under the most famous Jean Baptiste Lully. 'This is ambiguous (in all of the languages in which it was printed) as to whether the style was flourishing under Lully, or that Muffat studied under Lully. In any case, the style which the young Muffat learned was unequivocally Lullian and it remains likely that he had at least some contact with the man himself. After leaving...
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Georg Muffat was born in Megève, Duchy of Savoy (now in France), and was of Scottish descent. He studied in Paris between 1663 and 1669, where his teacher is often assumed to have been Jean Baptiste Lully. This assumption is largely based on the statement "For six years ... I avidly pursued this style which was flowering in Paris at the time under the most famous Jean Baptiste Lully. "This is ambiguous (in all of the languages in which it was printed) as to whether the style was flourishing under Lully, or that Muffat studied under Lully. In any case, the style which the young Muffat learned was unequivocally Lullian and it remains likely that he had at least some contact with the man himself.
After leaving Paris, he became an organist in Molsheim and Sélestat. Later, he studied law in Ingolstadt, afterwards settling in Vienna. He could not get an official appointment, so he travelled to Prague in 1677, then to Salzburg, where he worked for the archbishop for some ten years. In about 1680, he traveled to Italy, there studying the organ with Bernardo Pasquini, a follower of the tradition of Girolamo Frescobaldi; he also met Arcangelo Corelli, whose works he admired very much. From 1690 to his death, he was Kapellmeister to the bishop of Passau.
Georg Muffat should not be confused with his son Gottlieb Muffat, also a successful composer.

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Johann Pachelbel

Like Wagner has his Tristan-chord and Landini a self-titled cadence, Pachelbel has his canon in D, for which he will always be remembered. Unfortunately, this work is far from representative of his body of works: it's the only canon he ever wrote, and chamber music in general was only a marginal part of his complete works. Pachelbel was the son of wine salesman, who should have been known for his organ music today if it wasn't for his famous canon. In his own time, he was a celebrated organist, composing over 200 works for organ. Almost half of these are chorale settings, which thanks to their soberness and clarity form benchmarks of the genre. Another important part of his influence...
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Like Wagner has his Tristan-chord and Landini a self-titled cadence, Pachelbel has his canon in D, for which he will always be remembered. Unfortunately, this work is far from representative of his body of works: it's the only canon he ever wrote, and chamber music in general was only a marginal part of his complete works. Pachelbel was the son of wine salesman, who should have been known for his organ music today if it wasn't for his famous canon. In his own time, he was a celebrated organist, composing over 200 works for organ. Almost half of these are chorale settings, which thanks to their soberness and clarity form benchmarks of the genre. Another important part of his influence were his fugues. His Magnificat fugues are particularly noteworthy. A third genre in which Pachelbel excelled was the variation on a theme. A famous example is Hexachordum Apollinis, which is a serie of variations with keyboard arias. Finally, his vocal music is absolutely worth listening to, even though it has been in obscurity for a long time.


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Dieterich Buxtehude

Among the general public, Dieterich Buxtehude is mostly known due to the admiration Johann Sebastian Bach had for his organ and composing skills, for which Bach traveled to the North German city of Lübeck to stay with him for four months, no less. This says quite something about the quality of Buxtehude's performance, but even more so about the influence it had on Bach and all composers after him. Yet, nowadays Buxtehude's music does not need Bach to survive, as a matter of fact it is extraordinarily beautiful just by itself! Buxtehude was originally Danish, but he spent most of him life in Lübeck. His so-called 'Abendmusik', which was a series of evening concerts outside of the liturgy, grew famous. In...
more

Among the general public, Dieterich Buxtehude is mostly known due to the admiration Johann Sebastian Bach had for his organ and composing skills, for which Bach traveled to the North German city of Lübeck to stay with him for four months, no less. This says quite something about the quality of Buxtehude's performance, but even more so about the influence it had on Bach and all composers after him. Yet, nowadays Buxtehude's music does not need Bach to survive, as a matter of fact it is extraordinarily beautiful just by itself! Buxtehude was originally Danish, but he spent most of him life in Lübeck. His so-called 'Abendmusik', which was a series of evening concerts outside of the liturgy, grew famous. In the works he wrote for these occasions, his enormous fantasy and creative freedom truly shows. As an organ player, Buxtehude was widely famous. If you would listen to his Organ Preludes, you would quickly know why. Buxtehude manages to combine an unprecedented virtuosity with a large variety of styles and techniques. No wonder Bach traveled all that way to see him!


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Press

Play album Play album
01.
Toccata No. 8 in G Major
04:01
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
02.
Passacaglia in D Minor
06:21
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
03.
Suite No. 20 in D Major: I. Allemande
05:40
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
04.
Suite No. 20 in D Major: II. Gigue
02:03
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
05.
Suite No. 20 in D Major: III. Courante
01:30
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
06.
Suite No. 20 in D Major: IV. Sarabande
02:38
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
07.
Fantasia No. 2 in E Minor
04:48
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
08.
Ciaccona in C Major
04:53
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
09.
Aria Et 3 Variazioni in A Minor, BuxWV 249
06:29
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
10.
Auf Meinen Lieben Gott in E Minor, BuxWV 179: I. Allemande & Double
02:45
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
11.
Auf Meinen Lieben Gott in E Minor, BuxWV 179: II. Sarabande
01:01
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
12.
Auf Meinen Lieben Gott in E Minor, BuxWV 179: III. Courante
00:42
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
13.
Auf Meinen Lieben Gott in E Minor, BuxWV 179: IV. Gigue
00:45
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
14.
Toccata in A Minor
05:31
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
15.
Toccata in E Minor
03:45
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
16.
Suite in C Minor: I. Allemande
03:31
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
17.
Suite in C Minor: II. Gigue
01:03
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
18.
Suite in C Minor: III. Courante
01:13
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
19.
Suite in C Minor: IV. Sarabande Et Double
02:49
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
20.
Passacaglia in G Minor
07:49
(Johan Kaspar Kerll, Johann Jacob Froberger, Johann Pachelbel, Dietrich Buxtehude, Mathias Weckmann, Georg Muffat) Jacques Ogg
show all tracks

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